Tag Archives: robots

The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions

 

I love working at NTR Lab, partly because of the people, but also because we have a huge number of AI-related projects and really a strong R&D department. It’s fun to connect what I read in the news with what is going on in my company.

I’ve written a lot about our drone team, AI, etc. But because I work with this kind of stuff I can’t avoid thinking about in a philosophical way, as I’m sure many of you do. That’s why I want to share an article from the MIT Technology Review called “The Seven Deadly Sins of AI Predictions.” 

We’ve all heard about how robots will take our jobs in few years; I’ve written about this before. Because I am just 22, this is a major concern of mine and I like to keep eye on research and the thoughts in the field.

Sometimes surfing the Internet I see scary predictions about how robots take advantage of us — it sounds so sci-fi/non-realistic, with the terrifying predictions of the future for me and my kids and, of course, Terminator music playing in the background.

The MIT article has fresh point of view that I haven’t seen before and, for me, it really makes its point.

In short, the article says that predictions of a future full of robots are based on none-information, just dreams about the Singularity.

We believe in them in a non-logical way, because living with the speed of progress has made us believe everything that sounds more or less relatable.

The author describes seven reasons as to why people are making these kinds of predictions.

I really enjoyed the way he explains complicated philosophical theories and social differences between ages and technological eras.

While most of his theses are relatively simple and recognizable (if you are familiar with the tenets of philosophy) they are well-executed and extremely readable. And the illustrations are a nice addition.

It’s a short read and well worth your time.

‘Like’ it and let me know what you think.

Me and AI

 

credit: business insider
Google’s AI, Deep Dream, generated this.

Two weeks ago I shared a review of Geoff Colvin’s Humans are Underrated and promised to tell you more about why the AI discussion resonates so much with me.

Me in short: I was born and live in Tomsk, which is in Siberia. My mother is an economist and a military engineer by education. My father is air-conditioning engineer, but really proficient in modern tech just for fun. 

More importantly, I’m young, just 21, so all the talk about AI ( ) taking jobs and even making humans obsolete is worrying.

It’s not a sharp pain, but more like a subtle ache that you know you should do something about, but procrastinate, because it doesn’t seem all that urgent.

I read that robots will take over jobs and render humans superfluous.

And AI isn’t just a nebulous concept for me. I do business development for NTR Lab, which is considered an expert at building AI software and its component parts for clients.

Plus, my work means I talk to many of our clients — entrepreneurs creating new uses and applications for AI.

As a philosophy major this really bothers me; as someone who will live in the worlds described it sometimes scares me.

That’s probably why I refuse to focus on the “ache.”

It’s also why reading about Colvin’s book is so heartening.

It gives me hope that my studies in philosophy will give me the empathic edge I need to stay relevant.

Only time will tell.