Tag Archives: #vision

Vision

 

I have my second job in the music band named Wkhore.  If you are curious, you can see and follow us hereThat’s me up front singing .  As a frontwoman and a leader I’m the first who thinks about future of the band.  I have my  vision. 

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That’s  why this issue is particularly important for me.

Late last year we touched on the importance of vision and what how to turn a vision into reality.

As Eric Ries and all Lean Startup practitioners will tell you “forming a clear vision for your startup is perhaps the most important early thing an entrepreneur can do” — emphasis on clear.

Vision provides guidance to the organization by articulating not only what its product is supposed to achieve, but also sets its values and the environment in which it will happen.

Fred Wilson wrote: A big vision is critical for a big success. You have to know where you want to be in a decade or more. That’s where the long roadmap comes in. … it all starts with a plan. I know companies that are great at communicating but don’t really have a coherent plan. All the communicating in the world won’t help them.

So figure out where you are taking your company. Answer the basic question on everyone’s mind, “what are we doing?” and you will be on a path to building a loyal, hardworking, and motivated team”

But none of these skills will help if, in fact, you are pointed in the wrong direction.

That’s why founders who excel are also great listeners — and not just to those who agree with them.

The greatest danger of vision happens when it is the property of one person; one person who will do anything to sell the vision — anything except share and modify it.

That is why every founder needs to follow the lead of the Romans. When Roman generals rode through the streets for their victory parade they were required to have a person in the chariot who kept repeating “Remember, you are not a god.”

Guest Post: From Vision to Reality

Miki Saxon is the founder of RampUp Solutions, Inc. and has been both coach to and customer of NTR since 2000. Learn more about Miki here.

Whether you head a company, run a department, or lead a team, you are responsible for that ‘vision thing’ as it applies to those subordinate to you.

As founder, it’s your responsibility to identify, define and clarify the goals by which the vision becomes reality.

Then it’s up to you to involve your people, working with them to turn those goals into specific actions for which they are responsible.

 Most people are aware that work isn’t done in a vacuum, but often individuals, teams, or even departments, fail to truly understand the domino effect created by allowing their schedule to slip.

 You can minimize this problem, and improve the quality of your workforce, by making certain that they understand how their own goals, those of the company, and others’, both internal and external (customers and vendors), interact.

 The biggest rewards at all levels (using whatever incentives are available) should go to those who understand the company’s goals and ethically do whatever is necessary to achieve them—especially when they put the company’s goals ahead of their own.